MAGNESIUM DEFICIENCIES AND MIGRAINES
INTH-10101
8oz. Contains 64 servings
$29.95 8oz. Bottle
Reason for Loose Movements

Magnesium (Mg) is the 11th most abundant element by mass in the human body; its ions are essential to all living cells. Magnesium is an intracellular (inside the cell) ionically charged mineral. Approximately half of the total Mg in the body is present intracellular in soft tissues, and the other half is present in bone. Magnesium also helps in protein synthesis, helps promote strong and healthy bones and helps maintain normal nerve and muscle function.

All Intact Nutrition™ Brand Products Combined with our proprietary blend of Nutri-Mastic™ carry the best Magnesium that can be found. All Magnesium that is in Intact Nutrition™ Products come from the sea, untouched and ionically charged. Ionic and trace minerals play an important role in the function of the liver, kidneys, boosting red blood cells, amino acids, enzymes and iron, mobilizes calcium, supports the digestive system, muscles, joints, ligaments, tendons, immune system, reduces stress and frustration, supports PH balance and promotes relaxation.* >> Read more about Nutri-Mastic

Magnesium is an essential element which is a catalyst for more than 300 enzymatic reactions, in particular those involving ATP (Adenosine-5'-triphosphate). ATP transports chemical energy within cells for metabolism. Many aspects of cell metabolism are regulated by magnesium, such as DNA and RNA synthesis, cell growth, and cell reproduction. Magnesium also orchestrates the electric current that sparks through the miles of nerves in our body. Without magnesium, muscle and nerve functions are compromised and energy diminished. We are operating with the power turned off.

 

Intact Digest™ with Nutri-Mastic™ Supports Digestive Enzymes:

While you are finishing your latest meal, digestive enzymes are pouring into your small intestine from your liver, pancreas and gall bladder to break down the large macro-molecules into easily absorbable smaller particles. In order to process food as it passes through the intestines the body must absorb nutrients into the bloodstream as they are broken down into smaller micro-molecules. Minerals that are absorbed in their Ionic Form are electrically charged and have unique properties that distinguish them from each other and allow them to freely take part in biochemical communication throughout the body. These communications help nutrients to move to specific areas of the body, such as all the peristalsis muscles (involuntary muscles) such as the heart, lungs and digestive system which significantly help in all forms of digestive functions. >> History of Mastic

The importance of magnesium in the pathogenesis of migraine headaches is clearly established by a large number of clinical and experimental studies.** However, the precise role of various effects of low magnesium levels in the development of migraines remains to be discovered.

Magnesium concentration has an effect on serotonin receptors, nitric oxide synthesis and release, NMDA receptors, and a variety of other migraine related receptors and neurotransmitters. The available evidence suggests that up to 50% of patients during an acute migraine attack have lowered levels of ionized magnesium.

 

Which foods contain Magnesium?

Green vegetables such as spinach are good sources of magnesium because the center of the chlorophyll molecule (which gives these vegetables their color) contains magnesium. Some legumes (beans and peas), nuts, seeds, and whole, unrefined grains are also good sources of magnesium.

 

What are the Symptoms of low Magnesium?

Magnesium is important to the body, and so low magnesium can cause a host of problems, such as irregular heartbeats, loss of appetite, insomnia, weakness, shortness of breath, PMS, anxiety, dizziness, nausea, and poor coordination.

** Studies indicate infusion of magnesium results in a rapid and sustained relief of an acute migraine in such patients. Two double-blind studies suggest that chronic oral magnesium supplementation may also reduce the frequency of migraine headaches.

Good Health Begins with Good Digestion. Intact Digest™ with Nutri-Mastic™ should be part of your daily diet. The key to Good Health is to ensure that the body always receives an adequate and balanced supply of anti-oxidants and all mineral (elements) that will be of potential benefit to maintaining or restoring your personal health and wellness. Although the body manufactures some vitamins, it cannot manufacture a single mineral. All tissue contains minerals which are vital to our "Health and Wellness". Without these vital nutrients, it would be impossible for the body to function.

 

Caution

Not intended to treat chronic symptoms or disease.

 

Warnings
  • KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN.
  • DO NOT EXCEED RECOMMENDED DOSE.
  • Do not purchase if outer seal is broken or damaged.
  • When using nutritional supplements, please consult with your physician if you are undergoing treatment for a medical condition or if you are pregnant or lactating.

 

To report a serious adverse or obtain product information, contact 1-888-443-3335

**A number of studies have been done on the relationship between magnesium deficiency and migraine. Some excerpts from Medline abstracts are listed below:

Mauskop A, Altura BM; Role of magnesium in the pathogenesis and treatment of migraines; Clin Neurosci 1998;5(1):24-7 The importance of magnesium in the pathogenesis of migraine headaches is clearly established by a large number of clinical and experimental studies…However, the precise role of various effects of low magnesium levels in the development of migraines remains to be discovered. Magnesium concentration has an effect on serotonin receptors, nitric oxide synthesis and release, NMDA receptors, and a variety of other migraine related receptors and neurotransmitters. The available evidence suggests that up to 50% of patients during an acute migraine attack have lowered levels of ionized magnesium. Infusion of magnesium results in a rapid and sustained relief of an acute migraine in such patients. Two double-blind studies suggest that chronic oral magnesium supplementation may also reduce the frequency of migraine headaches. Because of an excellent safety profile and low cost and despite the lack of definitive studies, we feel that a trial of oral magnesium supplementation can be recommended to a majority of migraine sufferers. Refractory patients can sometimes benefit from intravenous infusions of magnesium sulfate.

Mishima K, Takeshima T, Shimomura T, Kitano A, Takahashi K, Nakashima K, Okada H; Platelet ionized magnesium, cyclic AMP, and cyclic GMP levels in migraine and tension-type headache; Headache 1997 Oct;37(9):561-4 Decreased serum and intracellular levels of magnesium have been reported in patients with migraine. It has been suggested that magnesium may play an important role in the attacks and pathogenesis of headaches…It is suggested that reduced platelet ionized magnesium in patients with tension-type headache is related to abnormal platelet function, and that increased platelet cyclic AMP in patients with migraine is related to alteration of neurotransmitters in the platelet.

Aloisi P, Marrelli A, Porto C, Tozzi E, Cerone G; Visual evoked potentials and serum magnesium levels in juvenile migraine patients; Headache 1997 Jun;37(6):383-5. …An inverse correlation between increased P100 amplitude and lowered serum magnesium levels was found in children suffering from migraine with and without aura in a headache-free period. A 20-day treatment with oral magnesium pidolate seemed to normalize the magnesium balance in 90% of patients. After treatment, the reduced P100 amplitude confirmed the inverse correlation with the serum magnesium.

Ferrari MD; Biochemistry of migraine; Pathol Biol (Paris) 1992 Apr;40(4). The author discusses changes in neuroexcitatory amino acids and magnesium, which may reflect a predisposition of the migraine patient, notably those having attacks with aura, to develop spreading depression.

Gallai V, Sarchielli P, Morucci P, Abbritti G; Magnesium content of mononuclear blood cells in migraine patients; Headache 1994 Mar;34(3):160-5. The migraine patients studied had a reduced mononuclear magnesium content compared to age-matched healthy control subjects. The authors say that the lower magnesium content in mononuclear cells could indirectly indicate the reduction of brain magnesium concentration, which has recently been demonstrated in the course of migraine.

Gallai V, Sarchielli P, Morucci P, Abbritti G; Red blood cell magnesium levels in migraine patients; Cephalalgia 1993 Apr;13(2):94-81; discussion 73 The authors believe that low red blood cell magnesium levels could be a peripheral expression of the reduced brain magnesium concentration observed in migraine patients.

Gallai V, Sarchielli P, Coata G, Firenze C, Morucci P, Abbritti G; Serum and salivary magnesium levels in migraine: Results in a group of juvenile patients; Headache 1992 Mar;32(3):132-5 "In the last few years a fundamental role for magnesium in establishing the threshold for migraine attacks and involvement in the pathophysiologic mechanisms related to its onset has become evident. In comparison with normal subjects, migraine patients had lower levels of serum and salivary magnesium interictally. Serum magnesium levels tended to be further reduced during attacks (which) could be an expression, at the peripheral level, of reduced cerebral magnesium levels which would contribute, at least in part, to defining the threshold for migraine attacks."

Sarchielli P, Coata G, Firenze, Morucci P, Abbritti G, Gallai V; Serum and salivary magnesium levels in migraine and tension-type headache. Results in a group of adult patients.Cephalalgia 1992 Feb;12(1):21-7. The authors state that serum magnesium levels and to a lesser extent salivary magnesium levels might express indirectly the lowering of brain extracellular magnesium concentration which occurs in migraine patients.

Taubert K; [Magnesium in migraine. Results of a multicenter pilot study]; Fortschr Med 1994 Aug 30;112(24):328-30. The hypothesis that magnesium may be useful in the prevention of migraine attacks has been confirmed by this pilot study. Further studies are in preparation.

Thomas J, Thomas E, Tomb E; Serum and erythrocyte magnesium concentrations and migraine; Magnes Res 1992 Jun;5(2):127-30. "The findings support the hypothesis of a magnesium deficit in people suffering from migraine and raise the problem of the relationship between migraine and other pathologies, including chronic magnesium deficit, latent tetany due to magnesium deficit, mitral valve prolapse, and allergy."

Thomas J, Tomb E, Thomas E, Faure G; Migraine treatment by oral magnesium intake and correction of the irritation of buccofacial and cervical muscles as a side effect of mandibular imbalance; Magnes Res 1994 Jun;7(2):123-7. This study shows that migraine patients have a magnesium deficit, which, while not constant, is a frequent occurrence.

Welch KM, Barkley GL, Tepley N, Ramadan NM; Central neurogenic mechanisms of migraine; Neurology 1993 Jun;43(6 Suppl 3):S21-5. This study indicates that low intracellular brain magnesium concentration may be the link between the physiologic threshold for migraine and the attack itself.

Welch KM, Barkley GL, Ramadan NM, D'Andrea G; NMR spectroscopic and magnetoencephalographic studies in migraine with aura: support for the spreading depression hypothesis; Pathol Biol (Paris) 1992 Apr;40(4):349-54. "The authors propose that patients who suffer from migraine with aura have a susceptibility to spontaneous neuronal discharges and subsequent spreading depression...hypersusceptibility is supported by increased turnover of high-energy phosphates, low intracellular Mg2+ and large amplitude depolarizing waves on magnetoencephalography ."

GUARANTEED RESULTS
Satisfaction 100% Guaranteed
We are so confident Intact Nutrition Products do what they claim to do that we guarantee complete satisfaction or your money back. If after 30 days you are not completely satisfied, refer to our return policy.